Category Archives: All Year Round Food

Simple Palabok Recipe

This is my first attempt to prepare Palabok. I’ve got my inspiration from Chef Tatung’s Simpol palabok recipe on Youtube. Although I made some modifications like cooking the ground pork thoroughly before adding the sauce.

Ingredients:

Excellent Pancit Palabok Noodles

For the sauce:

(I don’t have specific measurement for the ingredients. Tantyahan na lang. 😀 )
cooking oil
chopped onion
chopped garlic
dried shrimp (hibi)
annatto oil/water (atsuete)
all-purpose flour
2 Knorr shrimp cube
1/4 kilo ground pork
fish sauce (patis)
ground black pepper

For topping:

These are the only available ingredients for toppings I have in the kitchen. You can add variety of seafood for toppings such as, shrimps, mussels, squid.

chicharon baboy crushed
fried garlic
spring onions
boiled eggs
fried tofu (tokwa)

Procedure:

Boil pancit palabok noodles for 12 minutes to 15 minutes.
Saute ground pork in garlic and onion. Add dried shrimp. Add atsuete water mixture. Let it simmer. Add flour. Mix thoroughly. Add shrimp cube. Simmer. Add fish sauce and black pepper to taste. Simmer for a few more minutes.

Arrange the boiled noodles in a plate. Pour the sauce on the noodles. Add in toppings. Enjoy!

We have this for dinner last night and for breakfast this morning. 🙂

Phenomenal Malunggay to boost the immune system

Health officials are promoting the lowly Malunggay leaves as among the various vegetables (and fruits) to help boost the immune system (especially in time of the current health crisis).

The World Health Organization considers it as a low-cost health enhancer as it can be planted anywhere. Malunggay, scientifically known as Moringa oleifera, is dubbed as a miracle vegetable and nature’s medicine cabinet.

malunggay leaves

Malunggay is rich in Vitamins A, C, E, protein, iron, calcium, phosphorus, phytochemicals, and fiber which makes it a perfect aid in boosting one’s immune system.

Earlier, Health Secretary Francisco Duque recommended to public to add malunggay in their diet to have a stronger immune system.

“Drink fruit juices rich in Vitamin C. Put malunggay in your soup,” he said in an interview. Source: gmanetwork.com

Here’s some helpful information about the lowly yet phenomenal Malunggay:

  1. Malunggay leaves helps strengthens the immune system.
  2. Malunggay can help restores skin condition like acne treatment, controls blood pressure, relieves headaches and migraines.
  3. Malunggay tea can help strengthen the eye muscles.
  4. Malunggay tea can help heal inflammation of the joints and tendons.
  5. Malunggay tea can prevent intestinal worms.
  6. Malunggay can help increase semen count.
  7. Malunggay help normalize blood sugar level therefore preventing diabetes.
  8. Malunggay has anti-cancer compounds (phytochemicals) that help stop the growth of cancer cells.
  9. Malunggay helps relax and promotes good night sleep.
  10. Malunggay tea is used to treat fever and asthma.
  11. Malunggay help heals ulcers.
  12. Malunggay is high in calcium (four times the calcium in milk), therefore lactating mothers are advised to consume malunggay leaves to produce more milk for their babies. The young malunggay leaves are also boiled and taken as tea.
  13. Malunggay contains three times the potassium in bananas.
  14. Malunggay contain four times the vitamin A in carrots.
  15. An ounce of malunggay has the same Vitamin C content as seven oranges.
  16. Malunggay leaves contain two times the protein in milk.
  17. Malunggay seed is used to clean dirty or polluted water.

Source: http://www.yamikitchen.com/phenomenal-malunggay-leaves/

You can check my recipes with Malunggay ingredients from the links below:

From the archive: Beef Kare-Kare

After a few attempts, I was able to make a creamy Kare-Kare (Philippine stew). Yes, I did it. It was creamy alright, but still saucy. I’ll try to lessen the amount of beef stock next time. 🙂

If you don’t have time to cook, there are really good restaurants around that offer Kare-Kare for restaurant delivery. But personally, I prefer the home cooked Kare-Kare especially the ones prepared by my late grandmother. And Kare-Kare wouldn’t be exciting to eat without bagoong alamang (shrimp paste or shrimp sauce). You can make your own bagoong alamang or buy the bottled one.

For my home made Kare-Kare, I used beef meat (cubed). I put in about a cup of peanut butter and Kare-Kare mix and dissolved it with beef stock (pinaglagaan or pinagpalambutan ng karne) and let it boil with the beef meat until the sauce thickens. For the veggies, I added blanched sitaw (string beans), eggplant and pechay (pak choi) before I served Kare-Kare.

Next time, I’ll try to cook Kare-Kare using oxtail, offal or tripe.

This is an 8-year-old post. 😉